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20120901
20120930
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 40
KQED (PBS) 20
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome dwight yoakam back to this program. he is out with his first studio album in seven years. he is also being honored this month with a special award by the academy of country music. some of them -- some of the making of the new disc, "3 pears." ♪ ♪ ♪ tavis: good to have you back on the program. i did not realize that you have lived in los angeles for 30 years. >> when i got lost trying to get to your studio, i should have known better. i drove a couple of different jobs. i drove for another company that was based near the studio. transporting checks at night. everybody has a job. that was my job. to make a living with a guitar for a lot longer. i drove all over l.a., that was my life for a number of years. i'm one point, i was born in kentucky, raised in ohio, but i grew up in california. i felt like i became an adult here. i landed here. i dropped out of ohio state. we did beat yo
hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: hedrick smith spent more than 25 years at the "the new york times" covering six presidents and callous world conflicts. he is an emmy-winning tv producer. his new text is called "who stole the american dream?" >> i am delighted to be here. >tavis: you argue that the american people are more concerned about the divide between the rich and poor, more concerned about that than age, race, ethnicity. what happened? >> the middle class had a good life in america. especially when the civil rights battle was going on. we had an era of middle-class prosperity and power and those things go together. civic activism and power influencing washington make sure the economy and the government work to produce prosperity and what do we have today? we have polarized politics instead of working bipartisanship. we have gaping inequality in our economy. enormous wealth concentrated. citib
... where 4 americans were killed tuesday... including the u-s ambassador to libya.the ooama administration is still investigating the attacks to determine if they were spontaneous... or part of a long-forming plan. but it's still unnlear how to reduce tension in countries with a u-s presence. 1:09 bolton says: "backing away from the film is not going to eliminate the hatred or extremism. (butt to) the harder they push, the more we apologize, they'll just push more."-butt to-1:00- 1:07 yates says: "i think it's very very immortant noo to disengage from this vital region, we justthave to find a way that doesn't involve military invasions." invasions."secretary of state hillary clinton ii making calls to u-s ambassadors in muslim regions. the embassy in islamabad closed down today... as a precaution ahead of more planned protests. a deadly "superbug"... has killed a 7th person at maryland's national institutes of health clinical center.the latest victim is aayoung boy... who arrived in bethesda last april.doctors say he was here for a bone marrow transplant... when he contracted t
work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jamie lee curtis back to this program, the award winning actor and best selling author is out with her latest, my brave year of first. i love that title. but that is not a buck. >> you know what? this is taunting me. this is actually a certifiable taunting. tavis: james taylor and tavis smiley. >> i'm surprised that you are not making out. i know why you're mr. smiley. what's your favorite james taylor song? if you had asked me on the spot, if i am in your sea, the first song -- millworkers. tavis: carolina in my mind. sweet baby james is pretty good. maher >> flag is the best album. a company man. don't even start with me. tavis: every time she is on the show, we fight about who loves james taylor more. >> there is no one who speaks to me, musically, more than him. >> i love the humanity in his lyric. the content. in his voice. and i love this book. >> elected you seg
, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome salman rushdie that to the program. there was a fatwa placed against him following his release of "the satanic verses." welcome back to the program. are you all right? let me start with a quote from this book. the book, i should mention, is written in third person. but this is from the book. to hide in this way is to be stripped of all self-respect. to be told to hide was a humiliation. maybe he thought to live like this would be worse than death. in his book "shame," he wrote about the access of honor and shame, the opposite of the christian idea of guilt and redemption. he was not religious and cared deeply. to sculpt and hyde was to lead a dishonorable live. he felt in many years both shame and ashamed. that is the writing in "joseph anton," which leads me to ask, why write this book? you and i have met on a few occasions, but this was a book i did not think
and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: all right, please welcome david barber to the program, the noted author and furious at the center for the philanthropy and civil society at the university of new york. he is also the founder of interdependent state. it celebrates its 10th anniversary in l.a., and he joins us from new york. it is good to have you on the program. >> thank you, tavis. good to be here. tavis: the democrats in charlotte and republicans in tampa, where u.s. public policy is concerned, talk to me about what you have heard over these past two weeks and why not of it sounds to me like we are going to be working together over the next few months. >> well, i am afraid last week and particularly even this week, there is a lot about what america is going to do, but the reality is, we live in a world that it is not going to be the american century or the chinese century. it will be the global century altog
hunger and we have work to do. .s.mart committed r uge the .s.ighting hunger in the as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. >> be more. >> be more.
painting with too broad a brush, tavis, because we've done a lot. starting in the 1930s with social security and on up through the '60s, but really since then we have, besides social security, we have medicare, medicaid, food stamps, earned income tax credit, on and on, help with housing. so what we have is keeping 40 million people out of poverty. instead of 46 million people who we do have in poverty, which is unacceptable, we would have 86. so the question is not whether we don't care about it or whether we haven't done anything about it, but why is it that despite all we've done we still have poverty rates that are this high. tavis: the reason for why they're still this high is? >> we had a change in our economy starting in the 1970s, where the good, high-paying jobs that built much of the middle class in this country, certainly built the african american middle class in this country, along with municipal employment, those jobs went away. they were replaced, and it's good that they were replaced, by low-wage jobs. there's a flood of low-wage jobs. half the jobs in this country p
as they are now. i still love it. this is a gathering of mitt co-s all over the america. >> plumbers with have their convention. >> exactly why shouldn't politicians. you meet interesting people. i'm sure they can trade notes. a state rep from oregon and alabama have interesting things to talk about. >> charlie:john what do you get out of this. >> i have al beat mother of all conventions 1968 chicago convention. >> that's where i started runner for new york times driving a car back and forth. >> predictable results '72 wasn't much better with mcgovern 2:38 a.m. >> let's start with this idea. you have seen bill clinton today. >> yeah. >> charlie:what's it like to watch him prepare a speech and how does he approach this process. >> i think he's been thinking about it for a very long time, reading a lot thinking about what he needs to do. i think he's -- he prepared a draft of his speech and he's working on it through the day. >> charlie:he wrote it himself? >> yes. >> charlie:did he start with someone else's and add to it. >> wrote it himself. working with a few of his advisors try to trim it an
are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> please welcome arianna huffington back to this program. she is the founder of huffington opposed media group. she is also behind chateau convention, a nonpartisan alternative to the major conventions, focusing on poverty, influence of money and politics, and the war on drugs. she joins us from charlotte. good to have you on the program. let me start by asking in your views on what the republicans did in tampa last week. >> they must be wondering themselves what they did. this is a great opportunity to challenge the record of the last few years in terms of the economy, the middle class, poverty, but instead they have clint eastwood and the empty chair and a lot of empty speeches, more base on identifying who people are and their history and paul ryan saying a lot of things i agree common and now that the unemployed is not acceptable, the five napa how -- the fact the
. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeremy irons to the program, the oscar- winning actor which is out with a new program. it is called "the words," where one author plagiarizes another author's work. here is a scene from "the words." >> i read your book. i like it, very, very much. >> thank you. i really do appreciate it. >> i know, i know. artists always feel uncomfortable talking about their work. if there is just one thing you can do for me? >> sure. >> i am wondering if you can autograph a copy of my book. i do have a story, a very good story. i know you get this all of the time, but i think this story. if i were to tell you this story, and you wrote it, maybe then you could give me a little credit. >> well, that would be fair, would it not? good day. >> it is about a man who wrote a book and the piss and kid who found it. are you still here? tavis: so we are aging, and you decide to play even older. >> i know, i kn
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your you. thank you. >> i am pleased to welcome elizabeth banks to this program. her latest project is a comedy called "picture perfect." here are some scenes. >> the bad boys have just gotten badder. world power. >> this is a list of all the songs we have ever performed. >> there is nothing from this century on here. >> our goal is to get to the finals. >> of bikini car wash is at of the question. >> i am so good at bikini car washes. down for cardio. >> what are you doing? >> what is a rip-off? tavis: of good trailer is a trailer you see any pretty much get what the story line is about. that is a good trainer. i think they get it. >> we were going for making you laugh. is a very funny movie about a group of misfit girls. a very classic tale in a new setting, i think. tavis: one of the things i thought when i saw this is that there is something about the fact that there is something in the ether, something in americana right now that is being driven so much by competition. competition has
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)